talkin' under water
Thoughts about working for yourself

I listened to this about a week ago, and this bit kind of stuck with me, so I transcribed it… quote is by Tara Swiger in the Explore Your Enthusiasm podcast episode Navigating an art career, with Claudine Hellmuth:

I think that there’s this myth - and it’s a myth we tell ourselves so that we can keep working - “Okay, this thing is going to be done, or I’m going to be making this much in order to pay my bills, or I’m going to be able to quit my job, and then everything will be great.” And then, of course, immediately upon getting there, you’re actually already thinking of what’s ahead. So much so that I find a lot of people completely skip the celebration step.

And I think that that leads to the frustration of feeling like you’re kind of always turning your wheels, and always trying, striving. It can be exhausting.

I think that stopping and celebrating is good because it gives you a little break, and relief, but it also builds your confidence. So you recognize that “I’m the kind of person who can handle this. I have a new big goalpost ahead of me, but I did already do x, y, and z. So, I can trust that I’m gonna get through this.” And especially when times are hard, or you’re really stressed, or really up against a deadline, if you’ve taken the moment to celebrate, then you actually have a memory that you completed that goal, and you can look back and be like, “Okay, yes, I did that. I’m gonna be okay, I can keep going.”

So much truth here.  I’ve been doing this leethal business thing for almost 10 years now and I still always have this kind of underlying feeling when I think about a big project I’m working on, that once this one big project is done I can relax a bit, or things will be less stressful/overwhelming.  

But I am ALWAYS working on more than one project at once - getting started on the next thing while I’m still in the middle of the older thing, so by the time that one thing is done and over, I’m already in the middle of the huge new thing.  Always.  There is never a built-in break period between things.  

So, I think a kind of forced celebration/rest is very necessary, for sanity, and I am usually pretty good at making sure that happens - taking a day or two off major work to rest my mind a bit, after finishing a big thing.  And I love the point that thinking about the big project you’ve already successfully finished helps give you confidence to tackle the next one!

But yeah, it’s totally a myth that things will ever just automatically calm down once a project is done, or once a goal is accomplished.  The subconscious’s way of coping with stress, I guess, making us feel like that might be true.  This is not a terrible thing, just the reality of doing this type of work, so that’s why it’s important to take a minute (or a weekend, or a week, whatever) to decompress, and reflect, and feel proud of what you’ve done!  Good podcast thoughts, Tara!

Best mail day ever! Stitch dictionary I’ve been wanting for years, finally decided to go for it a few days ago when I found a slightly-better-than-normal priced used copy online. And, review copy of @cirilia’s new book, wooooo!!

Best mail day ever! Stitch dictionary I’ve been wanting for years, finally decided to go for it a few days ago when I found a slightly-better-than-normal priced used copy online. And, review copy of @cirilia’s new book, wooooo!!

xostitches:

archiemcphee:

Seattle-based artist Carol Milne knits with glass, or rather, she creates wonderful glass sculptures that make it seem as though she’s either a superhuman glass knitter or in possession of enchanted knitting needles and very specialized gloves. The reality is actually much more complicated, but no less awesome. Milne invented her glass knitting technique back in 2006. It’s a process that involves knitting with wax instead of glass, followed by lost-wax casting, mold-making and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

To check out more of Carol Milne’s extraordinary artwork visit the Glass Art SocietyMilne’s Facebook page or her online gallery.

[via Colossal]

Wow, knitting with glass.

WHOA

We hiked to Mirror Lake this morning for our 4 year wedding anniversary. Tonight: dinner and a movie at the Bagdad. Happy day :) (at Mirror Lake Hiking Trail)

We hiked to Mirror Lake this morning for our 4 year wedding anniversary. Tonight: dinner and a movie at the Bagdad. Happy day :) (at Mirror Lake Hiking Trail)

taraaabee:

cats for life

taraaabee:

cats for life

I’ve finally gotten around to fully deleting my old livejournal from my early 20’s, but first, I looked at what I was up to 10 years ago (I was 22).  Turns out it was exactly 10 years ago, almost to the day, that my childhood dog Bert died, so here’s a picture of him, what a sweet puppy he was!

But as for what I was up to - here’s something I wrote 10 years ago from yesterday: “been getting into making things again, loving it. knitting/crocheting/sewing till my hands are sore. … feeling optimistic about being able to sell handmade items sometime in the near future.”

And then I did!  I started selling things I made in 2005, just a little, getting more serious about it over the next few years, before leethal slowly evolved away from selling things as I focused more and more on knit design.  10 years ago, I didn’t even know that designing knitting patterns was a thing I could do - I just improvised everything I made.  It wasn’t until 2007 that I started playing around with writing patterns in a way that others could follow them.

Weird how 10 years ago, when I think about different parts of life, feels so recent, and also like an entirely different lifetime.  I was such a different person!  And I had NO IDEA where I was going with my life.  I like how things have gone :)

smartgirlsattheparty:

whippit-princess:

lasso:



Guys seriously would you LOOK at mini Adam Scott from Boy Meets World circa 1994



was this when he was mayor

reblogging for the comment :)

smartgirlsattheparty:

whippit-princess:

lasso:

Guys seriously would you LOOK at mini Adam Scott from Boy Meets World circa 1994

was this when he was mayor

reblogging for the comment :)

muffinlevelchicanery:

*heart*
REBLOG IF YOU WOULD BE LITERALLY 100% OKAY WITH FAN ART ABOUT YOU EVEN IF IT WAS JUST STICK MEN

clamourgirl:

leemeredith:

clamourgirl:

areslinkysart:

clamourgirl:

*imagining a world in which knitwear designers get fanart, lulz*

Here you go, clamourgirl

image

THIS IS ACTUALLY THE BEST THING THAT HAS EVER HAPPENED TO ME AND I AM DYING WITH GLEE NO DON’T EVEN TRY TO PREVENT IT IT’S TOO LATE I AM ALREADY DEAD.

Haha this is so great that I need to reblog just in case another knit designer is worthy of fan art!

Thought I’d pay it forward- I’ve been a fan of Lee’s designs since my noobie-knitter days! (Unfortunately for her, I can’t draw facial features, hands, plaid, or non-janky cats. Hehe.)

image

Aaaaaahhhahahaha!  AWESOME!  Banzo and I have been fanarted eeeeek!  THANK YOU ALEX!

REBLOG IF YOU WOULD BE LITERALLY 100% OKAY WITH FAN ART ABOUT YOU EVEN IF IT WAS JUST STICK MEN

clamourgirl:

areslinkysart:

clamourgirl:

*imagining a world in which knitwear designers get fanart, lulz*

Here you go, clamourgirl

image

THIS IS ACTUALLY THE BEST THING THAT HAS EVER HAPPENED TO ME AND I AM DYING WITH GLEE NO DON’T EVEN TRY TO PREVENT IT IT’S TOO LATE I AM ALREADY DEAD.

Haha this is so great that I need to reblog just in case another knit designer is worthy of fan art!

noirbettie:

prairie-homo-companion:

this is from a real diary by a 13-year-old girl in 1870. teenage girls are awesome and they’ve always been that way.

The best.

If they can learn to say Tchaikovsky and Michelangelo and Dostoyevsky, they can learn to say Uzoamaka.
Uzo Aduba’s mother proving that the idea of not being able to pronounce a POC’s name because it’s “too hard” or “too complicated” is complete bullshit and actually just laziness. (via cosmicspread)

ticytacs:

ladyinterior:

Paper Art, Maude White

and I didn’t want to cut out bat silhouettes 

Wow.

iconic